Concerts

In our tenth anniversary season, Pro Musica Colorado embarks on a musical journey that will take our audiences from the joy of creation, through reflections on love and death, finally to triumph. Please join us in finding wonder, inspiration, and hope in these masterful artistic creations! 

 

CREATION

creation

Joseph Haydn Creation 
with Colorado Masterworks Chorus, soprano Amanda Balestrieri, and tenor Steven Soph

October 28 at 7:30 pm | Central Presbyterian Church, 1660 Sherman St., Denver
October 29 at 7:30 pm | First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder

Described as “some of the most lovable and life-affirming music ever composed,” Haydn’s Creation draws upon Genesis with responses culled from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost. Starting with the Big Bang and stopping short of The Fall, Creation celebrates the beauty of our world. 


 

LOVE and DEATH

love

Shostakovich Symphony No. 14 
with Jennifer Bird-Arvidsson and Ashraf Sewailam

January 20 at 7:30 pm | First Baptist Church of Denver, 1373 Grant St., Denver 
January 21 at 7:30 pm | First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder

Composing this work from his hospital bed, Shostakovich produced a song-cycle symphony in which he set poems by Lorca, Rilke, Apollinaire, and Kuchelbecker “on the eternal themes of love and death.” Describing the work as “an impassioned protest against death,” Shostakovich found in death an inspiration for how to live.


 

TRIUMPH

triumph

Beethoven Symphony No. 3, Eroica
Carl Nielsen Flute Concerto, Christina Jennings, flutist 

April 7 at 7:30 pm | First Baptist Church of Denver, 1373 Grant St., Denver
April 8 at 7:30 pm | First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder 

Our season finale features Beethoven’s Heroic Symphony, a work of revolutionary scope. In the manuscript, Beethoven dedicated the work to Napoleon, whom he saw as a liberator of Europe. But when Napoleon later crowned himself emperor, Beethoven said “so he’s a tyrant like all others,” and scratched out the dedication with such vigor that he ripped the page.  The symphony then became universal:  it depicts the triumph of all of us who live the archetypal story that Joseph Campbell calls “The Hero’s Journey.”